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Charles Bridge

About Charles Bridge

Get the inside scoop on Charles Bridge from local experts, travel creators, and tastemakers. Browse genuine trip notes, Charles Bridge reviews, photos, travel guides, and itineraries from real travelers and plan your trip with confidence.

What people say

"The Charles Bridge is a remarkable example of Gothic and Baroque architectural styles. Its construction began in 1357 under the patronage of Emperor Charles IV, after whom the bridge is named. The bridge stretches approximately 516 meters (1,693 feet) in length and is supported by 16 arches, each with a tower on either end. The towers serve both as gateways to the bridge and as defense structures, showcasing a fusion of form and function. The bridge's most distinctive feature is the series of 30 statues that line its balustrades, depicting various saints and religious figures. A few interesting facts about the bridge: Foundation Legend: According to legend, Emperor Charles IV ordered the foundation stone of the bridge to be laid at a specific time - 5:31 AM on July 9, 1357. The numerical sequence (135797531) is believed to imbue the bridge with good luck and protection against floods. It is said that the mortar used in the construction of the Charles Bridge contains a unique ingredient - egg yolks. It is believed that egg yolks were mixed into the mortar to enhance its durability and strength. One of the most famous statues on the bridge is that of St. John of Nepomuk. Touching or rubbing the statue is believed to bring good luck and ensure a return visit to Prague. Over the years, the statue has become noticeably shiny due to the countless hands that have touched it. The statues on the bridge are not only artistically significant but also serve as valuable historical records. They provide insight into the religious and cultural values of the time, as well as the personalities and beliefs of the Czech people. During the Thirty Years' War in 1648, the Charles Bridge played a role in a unique defensive strategy. The Czechs removed several of the bridge's statues and placed wooden boards in their stead, creating the illusion that the bridge was in ruins. This tactic helped deter the advancing Swedish army. Many of the statues on the bridge are replicas, as the originals have been moved to protect them from weather and pollution. The replicas were crafted using traditional methods and materials to maintain the bridge's historical integrity."
"Charles Bridge is the oldest still-standing bridge in Prague, crossing the Vltava River. It is also a part of the "Royal Route" which begins in the Old Town and leads to Prague Castle. Its history takes you all the way back to the 14th Century when its foundation allowed for trade routes connections between the Western and Eastern parts of the Hungary Empire (today's Europe). King Charles IV had this bridge built in 1357, shortly after the original Judith's Bridge was damaged during a flooding incident. What you might find intriguing are the 30 life-sized statues on the bridge, as if leading you across the river through an open-sky gallery. The statues are mostly depicting famous Saints from Czech history with many of them having strong symbolic meanings. Today, Charles Bridge gets crowded with tourists and travelers visiting Prague. So our recommendation for you is to wake up early to capture the true peaceful beauty with your camera (without any other of those pesky tourists). Naturally, there are many legends and urban myths connected with the construction of the Charles Bridge. The most famous legend is about builders adding raw eggs to a mortar to strengthen the bridge and assure for its long future."
"Charles Bridge is the oldest still-standing bridge in Prague, crossing the Vltava River. It is also a part of the "Royal Route" which begins in the Old Town and leads to Prague Castle. Its history takes you all the way back to the 14th Century when its foundation allowed for trade routes connections between the Western and Eastern parts of the Hungary Empire (today's Europe). King Charles IV had this bridge built in 1357, shortly after the original Judith's Bridge was damaged during a flooding incident. There are 30 life-sized statues on the bridge, as if leading you across the river through an open-sky gallery. The statues are mostly depicting famous Saints from Czech history with many of them having strong symbolic meanings. Today, Charles Bridge gets crowded with tourists and travellers visiting Prague. Naturally, there are many legends and urban myths connected with the construction of the Charles Bridge. The most famous legend is about builders adding raw eggs to a mortar to strengthen the bridge and assure for its long future."

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Prague is definitely worth visiting. It is a beautiful city with rich history, stunning architecture, and cultural diversity. The city offers a range of activities, including sightseeing, exploring museums and galleries, enjoying the nightlife, and sampling delicious Czech cuisine. Additionally no, Prague is a relatively affordable city, making it an attractive travel destination for budget-conscious travelers. Souvenirs you can bring home: Bohemian Glass (near Prague, there are five Czech glass and crystal factories that can be visited), Prague Garnet (this precious gemstone is a symbol of the city’s rich cultural heritage), Mucha Posters by Alfons Mucha, Beer Cosmetics, Wooden Toys, Marionette Puppets, Karlovy Vary Spa Wafers, Kafka Museum Souvenirs, Special Reading Material from Palac Knih Luxor, Czech porcelain, the Prague golem, something with Krtek - the little mole (a famous cartoon character). When it comes to food, be sure to check: - Kolachkes (Traditional Czech Cookies) are small, sweet, and perfect for snacking on while exploring the city; made from a rich, buttery dough that is rolled into small balls and then filled with a variety of sweet fillings such as fruit preserves, nutella or poppy seeds (and are often sprinkled with powdered sugar for an extra touch of sweetness) - Trdelník, made from a dough composed of yeast, flour, sugar, and eggs, the seemingly gourmet treat is wrapped around a spit and grilled until crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. Traditionally coated in sugar and cinnamon for a sweet and aromatic flavor. Beverages? Beer, Becherovka (Herbal Liquor), Absinthe. Highlights: 🍺 Beer - The Czechs will tell you that their beer is the best in the world, and they ought to know. Per capita, the Czech Republic consumes more beer than any other country. Pilsner Urquell, the worldʼs first pilsner beer, is top of the line; Gambrinus, made at the same brewery, is also good. The dark Krušovice has a surprisingly light quality; Budvar is the original Budweiser; and Staropramen is the Czech Republicʼs proud working-class brew. Small brewery labels, like Bernard and Lobkowicz, are also worth trying. Czech beer is rated by degrees – 10 degree, 11 degree, 12 degree – with the alcohol content increasing as the numbers rise. 🗿The Golem - Prague golem is a legendary figure in the city’s history and has become a popular souvenir for visitors. The Golem is said to have been created in the early 19th century by a rabbi named Judah Loew, who used the creature to protect the Jewish people from persecution. According to legend, the golem was made of clay and was brought to life through a magical ritual; it quickly became known for its immense strength and loyalty to its creator, but its power was also feared. Eventually, the rabbi realized he needed to destroy the creature before it caused any harm. Today, the golem is a symbol of Jewish heritage and the power of folklore.
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